Ambiguous Discourse: Feminist Narratology & British Women Writers

By Kathy Mezei | Go to book overview
narrator or character" (254). Although Chatman uses this example to show how "narrator and character are so close, in such sympathy, that it doesn't matter to whom the statement is attributed" (254), it seems to me that Woolf's indifference is deliberate. Interestingly, Wayne Booth in his Rhetoric of Fiction is rather aggrieved by this ambiguity, quoting David Daiches in relation to To the Lighthouse to support his complaint that the distinction between the thought processes of author and characters was not clear enough (373 n. 27).
23.
See Pamela Caughie's discussion of the narrator-character boundaries in which she points out that what is "striking about [ Woolf's] narrators is just how obtrusive they are," which has the effect of disturbing our "habitual relations to the narrative" (64). She goes on to comment that "blurring distinctions between characters and between characters and narrator, Woolf makes the source of a thought doubtful, thereby inhibiting our tendency to seek the author's view in the characters or narrator" (75).
24.
As Suzanne Ferguson points out, "the disappearance of the author has been such an article of faith . . . that . . . readers and teachers have gone about analysis of a number of third-person impressionist works just as if the author had in fact withdrawn, when actually his presence is quite palpable and might even be seen to give impressionist works one of their characteristic qualities, i.e., that of a 'multiple vision': simultaneous perspectives" (231).
25.
See Stefan Oltean, "Textual Functions of Free Indirect Discourse in the Novel Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf," where he argues that "FID in Mrs. Dalloway, as a mode of duality, plurality and equivocation of the enunciative rather than the denotative positionality, sustains a type of psychological realism consisting in the representation of the manner in which existence is reflected in several centers-of- consciousness concomitantly engaged in a continuous dialogue with the narrator and situated under the control of the latter" (547).
26.
See also her comments that [Lytton] "thinks she is disagreeable and limited, but that I alternately laugh at her and cover her, very remarkably, with myself" ( Writer's Diary, 78).
27.
The use of "of course" is an example of a linguistic marker indicating social positioning and attitudes, one that is meant to draw the reader into the upper middle-class world of the Dalloways. Woolf captures, mimics, and mocks this discourse as she does the pretensions of this class, but she is also careful to represent it. See Janet Giltrow's discussion of the "ironies of politeness" for a careful analysis of the construction and effects of this kind of discourse.

WORKS CITED

Austen-Leigh, James Edward. Memoir of Jana Austen. London: Oxford University Press, 1926.

Austen, Jane. Emma. 1816. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985.

-----. Persuasion. 1818. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965.

Bakhtin, M. M. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ambiguous Discourse: Feminist Narratology & British Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.