Ambiguous Discourse: Feminist Narratology & British Women Writers

By Kathy Mezei | Go to book overview
sometimes passions for older women played out Woolf's "great romance with her dead mother" (96).
21.
For accounts and interpretations of sexual abuse in the Stephen family, see, for example, Woolf, "A Sketch of the Past" and "22 Hyde Park Gate" in Moments of Being (68-69, 162-78); Quentin Bell, Virginia Woolf (43-44, 78, 95-96); DeSalvo, Virginia Woolf. According to Bell, Woolf's half-brother George Duckworth repeatedly molested Virginia, possibly after the death of Julia Stephen (when she was thirteen), but more likely after the death of her father in 1904 and then again after her first social debut (when she was about seventeen) (43-44). Gerald Duckworth, her other half-brother, stood her on a ledge and "explored my private parts," which led, she believed, to her shame about her body and her looking-glass phobia ( "Sketch,"68-69). According to DeSalvo, incest and sexual abuse were part of the climate of the Stephen family and affected Virginia's sisters, Stella and Vanessa (1-70).

WORKS CITED

Abel, Elizabeth, Marianne Hirsch, and Elizabeth Langland, eds. The Voyage In: Fictions of Female Development. Hanover: University Press of New England, 1983.

Bakhtin, M. M. "Forms of Time and Chronotope in the Novel." The Dialogic Imagination. Ed. Michael Holquist. Trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981. 84-258.

Barthes, Roland. "Introduction to the Structural Analysis of Narratives." 1966. Image-Music-Text. Trans. Stephen Heath. New York: Hill and Wang, 1977.79-124.

Bell, Quentin. Virginia Woolf: A Biography. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972.

Bersani, Leo. A Future for Astyanax: Character and Desire in Literature. New York: Columbia University Press, 1984.

Boone, Joseph Allen. Tradition Counter-Tradition: Love and the Form of Fiction. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

Breuer, Josef, and Sigmund Freud. Studies on Hysteria. 1895. Trans. James Strachey. New York: Basic Books, n.d.

Brooks, Peter. Reading for the Plot: Design and Intention in Narrative. New York: Vintage, 1984.

Chambers, Ross. Story and Situation: Narrative Seduction and the Power of Fiction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984.

Chatman, Seymour. Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978.

Coetzee, J. M. "The Spread of Racist Thinking. Metaphors of Metonymy." Paper delivered at the International Conference on Narrative Literature. Nice, France, 14 June 1991.

Conrad, Joseph. The Heart of Darkness. 1899. London: Heinemann, 1921.

Culler, Jonathan. "Textual Self-Consciousness and the Textual Unconsciousness." Style 18 ( 1984): 369-76.

DeKoven, Marianne. Rich and Strange: Gender, History, Modernism. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ambiguous Discourse: Feminist Narratology & British Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.