Ambiguous Discourse: Feminist Narratology & British Women Writers

By Kathy Mezei | Go to book overview

notes on the contributors

Melba Cuddy-Keane has published numerous essays on Joyce Cary and on Virginia Woolf in such journals as Contemporary Literature, Cultural Critique, Journal of Modern Literature, PMLA, and Studies in the Novel. She is associate professor of English at the University of Toronto, where she also serves as vice-principal and associate dean of the Scarborough Campus. She is a founding member of the Joyce Cary Society and president of the Virginia Woolf Society. Her current project is a book-length study entitled "Poetics in Praxis: Virginia Woolf's Literary Theory."

Denise Delorey has taught at Brandeis, MIT, and Boston University. She recently received her Ph.D. from Brandeis. Her dissertation is on gender and the uses of allegory in the (post)modern novel

Rachel Blau DuPlessis has recently published The Pink Guitar: Writing as Feminist Practice ( 1990), Tabula Rosa ( 1987), and Drafts 3-14 ( 1991). She edited The Selected Letters of George Oppen ( 1990) and, with Susan Stanford Friedman, coedited Signets: Reading H.D. ( 1990). DuPlessis is the author of Writing beyond the Ending: Narrative Strategies of Twentieth-Century Women Writers ( 1985) and H. D.: The Career of That Struggle ( 1986) and teaches in the English Department at Temple University.

Susan Stanford Friedman is the Virginia Woolf Professor of English and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of Penelope's Web: Gender, Modernity, H.F.D.'s Fiction ( 1990) and Psyche Reborn: The Emergence of H.D. ( 1981); coauthor of The Women's Guide to Therapy ( 1979); editor of Joyce: The Return of the Repressed ( 1993); and coeditor of Signets: Reading H.D. ( 1991). She was president of the Society for the Study of Narrative Literature ( 1992) and has published several articles on narrative theory.

Janet Giltrow teaches in the English Department at Simon Fraser University. She has published artides on Canadian and American literature, on rhetoric and composition, on linguistic-pragmatic approaches to style, and on genre in American Literature, Postmodern Studies, Style, Canadian Literature, and Technostyle. Her textbook, Academic Writing, has recently appeared in a revised edition ( 1995), along with a companion anthology, Academic Reading ( 1995).

Linda Hutcheon is professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Narcissistic Narrative: The Metafictional Paradox ( 1980; rpt. 1984); A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms ( 1985); A Poetics of Postmodernism: History, Theory, Fiction ( 1988); The Politics of Postmodernism ( 1989); and Irony's Edge: The Theory and Politics of Irony ( 1995). She has also published a number of studies of Canadian culture, including The Canadian Postmodern ( 1988); Splitting Images: Contemporary Canadian Ironies ( 1991); and, with Mark Cheetham, Remembering Postmodernism: Trends in Recent Canadian Art ( 1991).

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