The Word Irony and Its Context, 1500-1755

By Norman Knox | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY
[In the following Bibliography are listed the titles referred to in the text and other sources upon which this work is based. Not listed are bibliographies and general surveys which contributed nothing directly, sources examined which con- tain no relevant material, and books and articles on irony published since about 1760 not referred to in the text.]
Abercromby David. A Discourse of Wit. London, 1686.
Addison Joseph. The Free-Holder, No. 45, Friday, May 25, 1716. ( Augustan Reprint Society, Ser. 1, Essays on Wit No. 1, 1946.)
Ainsworth Robert. Thesaurus Linguae Latinae compendiarius . . . Im- provements By Samual [sic] Patrick. Third edition; London, 1751.
Aldridge Alfred Owen. "Shaftesbury and the Test of Truth", PMLA, XL ( 1945), 129-60.
[ Apsley Allen.] Order and Disorder: or, the World Made and Un- done. Being Meditations upon the Creation and the Fall. . . . Lon- don, 1679.
Arbuthnot John. Life and Works. Edited by George A. Aitken. Oxford, 1892.
Aristophanes. The Birds. Translated by Benjamin Bickley Rogers. Loeb Classical Library.
-- The Clouds. Translated by Benjamin Bickley Rogers. Loeb Classical Library.
The Wasps. Translated by Benjamin Bickley Rogers. Loeb Classical Library.
Aristotle. The "Art" of Rhetoric. Translated by John Henry Freese. Loeb Classical Library.
-- The Nicomachean. Ethics. Translated by H. Rackham. Loeb Classical Library.
Aristotle's Rhetoric; Or the True Grounds and Principles of Oratory; Shewing, The Right Art of Pleading and Speaking in full Assemblies and Courts of Judicature. Made English By the Translators of the Art of Thinking. In Four Books. London, 1686.
The Art of Complaisance or the Means to oblige in Conversation. Lon- don, 1673.

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The Word Irony and Its Context, 1500-1755
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • One - The Meaning of Irony: Introduction And Summary 3
  • Two - The Meaning of Irony: The Dictionary 24
  • The Dictionary 38
  • Three - The Methods of Blame-By-Praise Associated with Irony 99
  • Four - Criticism of the Art of Irony 141
  • Five - Raillery and Banter 187
  • Bibliography 222
  • Index 253
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