Theories of Mathematical Learning

By International Congress on Mathematical Education; Leslie P. Steffe et al. | Go to book overview

17 Theory of Mathematics Education: The Contributions of Constructivism

Gerald A. Goldin Rutgers University

It was a great privilege to organize and participate in the working subgroup at ICME 7 devoted to the contributions of constructivism. This section of the volume contains articles based on the presentations during the 3 days in August 1992 that our subgroup met in Québec, substantially revised by the authors. It offers a variety of perspectives to the reader, some mutually supportive and some sharply conflicting.1

On the first day of the meeting, our main focus was on the philosophical side of constructivism. Here von Glasersfeld's contribution provides an overview of radical constructivist epistemology, emphasizing the irrevocable subjectivity of the experiential world and reiterating that this experiential reality is necessarily constructed. He stresses that this is not to deny the existence of a "real" world-- only to assert its inherent unknowability. The requirement that knowledge be "true" is dropped; knowledge is only required to be "viable," and to "fit into the world of the knower's experience." Von Glasersfeld stresses particularly that in mathematics, "the need for an experiential basis for the abstraction of concepts is often overlooked."

The chapter by Marton and Neuman, which Neuman presented in Québec,

____________________
1
I would like to acknowledge Jere Confrey and Ralph Mason, who recorded insightful notes of our subgroup's discussion each day. I wrote a brief summary in August 1992 of those discussions, which appeared in the Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Mathematical Education ( Gaulin, Hodgson, Wheeler, & Egsgard, 1994). Unfortunately, some time after that manuscript left my hands, transcription errors led to some rather puzzling ideas being attributed to my colleagues, especially Ernst von Glasersfeld and Paul Ernest. I trust these will be disregarded by posterity, with the present volume taken as the more definitive expression of our subgroup's work.

-303-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theories of Mathematical Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.