Theories of Mathematical Learning

By Leslie P. Steffe; Pearla Nesher et al. | Go to book overview

25
Constructivism and Its Consequences for Training Teachers

Claude Janvier Université du Québec à Montréal

The aim of this chapter is to examine the consequences of constructivism for the training of secondary level mathematics teachers. In the first section, I expose my understanding of what constructivism is. This enables me to draw inferences for teaching. It is argued that constructivism is only concerned with learning and not with teaching. As a consequence, it is only possible to specify constructivist conditions that must be respected in order to make "good" learning happen. These conditions lead us, in the next section, to the objectives that constructivism suggests for teachers' training. At this point, the stage is set to proceed to a fair description of the intricate web of cognitive processes underlying the training of teachers who, in short, are taught to learn about learning and teaching. In the final section, I present and analyze the constructivist content and objectives of a few training/learning activities that my colleagues and I, at Université du Québec A Montréal (UQAM), have been developing over the last few years in our program.


CONSTRUCTIVISM: FROM PHILOSOPHY TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

For me, constructivism is primarily a philosophical theory or position about knowledge and knowledge acquisition. Its objectives are to rationally explain (by providing a model) knowledge and knowledge acquisition by using a coherent discourse based on major concepts belonging to various branches of philosophy. Its main feature, as I see it, is to acknowledge, as its starting point, the fact that the "knower," in the development of his or her knowledge, is dramatically isolated and individually confronted with his or her experiential contact with

-449-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theories of Mathematical Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.