AUTHOR'S ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND FOREWORD

President Moulton in his preface has given the history of this project and explained how I happened to fall heir to a large part of the work which it has entailed. Although single authorship may have resulted in better integration of the several parts, I should have preferred carrying the project through more rapidly as a group undertaking with the younger men who were to have been associated with it.

Some of these associates had done a substantial amount of work on the project as originally conceived before they were called to other more pressing activities. I have had the advantage of their work and their counsel. I want to acknowledge this assistance here, because where I have used the results of their labor in preparing the text, the footnote references are necessarily to the sources from which they obtained the data and not to their manuscripts or working papers. In referring to these associates I shall indicate the nature of the activities which in general made further service on the project impracticable.

Lieutenant Melvin W. Sneed of the Navy, whom the Brookings Institution borrowed from the Social Security Commission of Missouri, where he was chief of the Division of Research and Statistics. He was a member of the original directing committee on the project. Because of his wide and intensive knowledge of the field, and particularly of the statistical data, his advice and assistance were invaluable. I shall refer to his contribution again in another connection.

Lieutenant Colonel Charles A. H. Thomson of Military Intelligence. He prepared for the use of those on the initial project an excellent history of the developments in the field, and before he left the Institution had written comprehensive descriptions of the National Youth Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps.

-xi-

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