Dictionary of World Literature: Criticism, Forms, Technique

By Joseph T. Shipley | Go to book overview

E

ecbasis. Rh. Digression. If simple, Diexodos. By lengthy divagation: Parecbasis. Introducing a person that speaks: Ecbole. By turning back, to try another tack: Anachoresis. Epanaclesis: by revocation. In order to explain: Exegesis (still in general use). The return to the main movement: Antanaclasis. All may be found in Tristram Shandy.

ecbole. See ecbasis.

eccyclema (Gr. ekkyklema). Th. A wooden machine, mounted on wheels. When turned it revealed the interior of the house or temple whose exterior was the chief background for the drama. This machine, apparently some sort of revolving stage, made possible a certain change of scene, and allowed both the dead bodies of murdered characters to be shown to the spectators, and the murderers themselves to enter the action on the stage. Used esp. by Euripides and Aristophanes. (There is no agreement among scholars about the nature, purpose, or origin of the eccyclema.) M. Bieber, The Hist. of the Gr. and Rom. Th., 1939; R. C. Flickinger. See Exostra; Stagesetting. L.R.L.

echo. Pros. (1) The regular recurrence of a sound (word or phrase) as at the end of successive stanzas; a refrain, e.g., in the ballade ( Chaucer, Truth) in free verse (Sandburg, "in the dust, in the cool tombs"). (2) The looser (and subtler) intertwining of such sound throughout a poem, e.g., "O sister swallow" in Itylus ( Swinburne). (3) Echo rhyme: coincidence likewise of the consonant before the accented vowel (meet, mete, meat), normal in Fr. if the meanings are different, rare in Eng. Also called perfect and identical rhyme. (4) Recurrences of a sound in rapid succession, e.g., Shak., "In spring time, the only merry ring time, when birds do sing hey ding a ding ding." Attacked in 19th c. verse by Nordau ( Degeneration, 1893) as echolalia; defended by Shaw ( Sanity and Art, 1895). Developed by Gertrude Stein ( Tender Buttons, 1914; Four Saints in Three Acts, 1934) and the surrealists. See Repetend.

echo verse. A line followed by an "echo," repeating with different intention its last syllables (or a poem of such lines) ; usually for humor. E.g., (sestina by Barnaby Barnes, 1559-1609):

What shall I do to my Nymph when I go to behold her? Hold her.

echoici versus.See Palindrome.

echoism; echo, echoic word. Onomatopœia, q.v. See also Word Creation.

eclaircissement, L'.See Rationalism.

Eclectic Review (1805-68). Its purpose was "to blend with impartial criticism an invariable regard to moral and religious principles"; as a consequence, it represents the trend that converted reviewing to sectarian ends. It attacked Byron's verse, Richardson's novels, even the genteel prose of Addison. Maurice J. Quinlan , Victorian Prelude, 1941. W.S.K.

eclipsis. Rh. P. "The figure of default." Omitting essential grammatical elements, e.g., "So early come?"

eclogue (Gr. eklegein, to select). Pros. The L. plural eclogæ was applied by scholiasts to Virgil's ten bucolics or pastoral poems, possibly from their use for reading and recitation in the schools. The Middle Ages changed ecloga to ægloga or egloga, a misnomer which, reinforced by the Fr. form églogue, persisted with Renaissance writers. With reference to the Shepheardes Calendar ( Spenser, 1579), E. K. defends æglogues, which he erroneously derives from the Gr. meaning "goteheards tales." In addition to the conventional pastoral of the 16th c., with which it came to be identified, the word eclogue also designated any rustic dialogue in verse. With the growth of pastoral drama and romance, gradually the distinction arose between 'pastoral,' referring to content and 'eclogue,' referring to form. Thus the 18th c. produced town eclogues and others having no association with shepherd life. As successor, then, to the idyll (first written by Theocritus, 3d c. B.C.) 'eclogue' preserved its similar dramatic character. It may be loosely defined as a dramatic poem which, without appreciable action or characterization, includes (1) an objective setting, described by the poet or one

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of World Literature: Criticism, Forms, Technique
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • ADVISERS and CONTRIBUTORS vii
  • SUGGESTIVE LIST OF ASSOCIATED TOPICS xi
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • A 1
  • B 63
  • C 82
  • D 145
  • E 182
  • F 229
  • G 277
  • H 296
  • I 310
  • J 339
  • K 346
  • L 347
  • M 365
  • N 394
  • Q 468
  • S 500
  • T 572
  • U 599
  • W 619
  • Y 631
  • Z 633
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 642

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.