In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and Their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England

By Peter Beal | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II
Manuscripts by the Feathery Scribe
This checklist, arranged alphabetically by geographical location, covers all examples of the Feathery Scribe's writing that I have come across hitherto. All texts listed here, as well as their titles or headings cited, are entirely in Feathery's hand unless otherwise stated. The titles are cited as accurately as is practicable, although, given the circumstances of their accumulation, in a variety of locations over a period of two decades, there will inevitably be occasional inconsistencies (unclear distinction between minuscule and majuscule lettering, for instance, or punctuation overlooked because of faded ink, etc.). To simplify matters I have also decided to make no attempt to reproduce the prolific diacritics found in these titles, the scribe's characteristic swirling tildes covering not only standard abbreviations (such as 'con' or 'Robte') but much other lettering besides. Although generally citing titles of each 'work', I have opted to summarize a few collections of multiple works, such as brief poems or letters.Some standard printed sources are cited for identification purposes, although I have not attempted to track down all printings of every title (such as miscellaneous state papers or parliamentary speeches), nor to record other MS copies of each title (which are sometimes numerous) unless of special interest (such as authors' own manuscripts or manuscripts owned by Sir Robert Cotton).Those 'works' which appear to correspond to items represented in the list of papers found in Ralph Starkey's study (see Appendix III below) are signalled accordingly ('Cf. Starkey No. 1', etc.). References to the catalogues of the public notary Humphrey Dyson (d. c. 1632) are to his manuscript catalogues, including prices paid or charged, in All Souls College, Oxford, MS 117 (see Chapter 3 n. 35 above), and for references to Sir Richard Grosvenor's list of manuscript volumes, see Chapter 3 n. 46 above.Three manuscripts discovered at copy-editing stage of this book have been added as Nos. 17A, 79A, and 110A, and cross-referenced accordingly. It is unlikely that they will be the last additional products of the Feathery Scribe to come to light.
Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales

1. Castell Gorfod MS 1
[Folio, 88 leaves; volume of state tracts; from the library of the 19th-century antiquary Joseph Joseph, FSA, of Brecon, enlarged by James Buckley of Castellgorfod, Breconshire. Watermark: pillars. See also p. 269 below.]
1.1. ff. 1r-5r: A: Lre written by the Lordes: of the Councell, to kinge James, dated the 〈 〉 daye of, 〈 〉 Anno, 〈 〉 Touchinge, meanes to aduaunce his Revenewes by vnusuall meanes, soe as the kinge will take the Acte vppon himselfe, and bee their Protection:

[Probably dated early 1606. Cf. 53.12, 71, 82.4, and 83 below; Starkey No. 19.]

1.2. ff. 5r-6v: Abatementes now in beinge: or to bee very shortlye, vppon the Marryage of the Ladye Elizabeth to the Counte Pallatyne of the

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