7
Foreign Policy

THE ADMINISTRATION has made many protestations of noble aims in foreign policy, but when the moment came to act on them, it has hesitated and compromised. Its foreign policy has not been to support American principles of freedom. It has dealt with the fascist elements in conquered countries; it has disregarded the will of the people of those countries; it had stubbornly and incredibly refused to acknowledge the Committee of Liberation as the Provisional French Government. It has been canny and personal and subjective. It has called this policy expediency. But since the policy has produced little but dislike, distrust and loss of prestige for the United States without achieving the intended political aims, it has not been even expedient.

The formulation of an affirmative foreign policy by the Republican Party is thus a particularly important platform task. There have been sharp divisions within the Party concerning the extent to which it is desirable for the United States to maintain and develop relations with other nations. But surely the long debate, the events through which we lived before the war, and the war itself have made plain that American policy cannot be separated into two unrelated compartments, one labelled Foreign Policy and one Domestic Policy. The two areas of action are inseparable; what happens in either immediately affects the other.

We are not living in several worlds. Our small American farms, our huge American factories, have close bonds with what is produced in the Andes and the hills of Szechuan, with the complex trade mechanism of London, with the cargoes that sail from Bombay and Oslo and Melbourne. Whatever we do at home constitutes foreign policy. And whatever we do abroad

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An American Program
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Foreword *
  • Title Page *
  • Publisher's Note *
  • Contents 1
  • 1 - Federal Power and States' Rights 3
  • 2 - The Negro 6
  • 3 - Social Security 9
  • 4 - Economy of Demobilization 12
  • 5 - Labor 16
  • 6 - Tariff and International Trade 19
  • 7 - Foreign Policy 22
  • 8 - Proposed Platform Preamble 26
  • 9 - Cowardice at Chicago 37
  • 10 - Our Negro Citizens 48
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 58

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.