Aiding and Aging: The Coming Crisis in Support for the Elderly by Kin and State

By John Mogey | Go to book overview

4
KINSHIP PATTERNS AND HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION AMONG ELDERLY HUNGARIAN WOMEN, 1984

Douglas A. Wolf


INTRODUCTION

In Hungary, as in many other countries in Europe and elsewhere, the population has been becoming more aged for many years. The phenomenon of population aging is projected to continue for several decades. For example, the percentage of the population aged 60 and over in Hungary rose from 11.3 in 1950 to 18.2 in 1985; the most recent projections by the United Nations ( 1988) indicate a further rise, to 24.2 percent, by 2025. The increasing numerical importance of the elderly has tended to focus the attention of scholars and policymakers on issues relating to the living conditions of the elderly. Their household structure and family relations have received particular attention; in the case of Hungary's older population, for example, the importance of family relations has been stressed by Cseh- Szombathy ( 1983, 1987) and Klinger ( 1986).

Accompanying the trend toward a more elderly society has been a trend toward smaller households in the population at large but also among the elderly population. Several recent papers--for example, Keilman ( 1987), Link ( 1987), and Schwartz ( 1988)--have documented the trend toward smaller households in postwar Europe. An intriguing question, of course, is whether there is an association between population age structure--that is, its age composition--and the size distribution of households containing elderly people. A rather simple argument suggests that there is such an association. Population aging is, to a great extent,the consequence of reduced fertility; when those cohorts whose reduced fertility caused the aging themselves reach old age, they have

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aiding and Aging: The Coming Crisis in Support for the Elderly by Kin and State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.