Health Care Patterns and Planning in Developing Countries

By Rais Akhtar | Go to book overview

disease symptoms and to the curandero to remove the cause of the disease. A study of recent migrants to Guatemala City found that they were uninterested in preventive health care and only demanded curative measures when an illness reached an advanced stage. Even then they seldom followed medical advice and failed to use prescriptions or even return for checkups. Yet they would rely heavily on the advice of pharmacists, neighbors, and other nonmedical personnel. A hypothetical sequence of responses exemplifies a mother's delay in time of family illness:

First, she will try all remedies she herself has found to be effective. These will most frequently be herbs, but will also include common patent medicines such as aspirin, zinc oxide, and cough syrup. If these are unsuccessful, she will ask her neighbors, especially older women, who are usually more than glad to give advice. After trying a number of similar recommended home remedies, she will finally consider seeking a specialist. At this point, she will either call in a local curandero, if one lives nearby, or she may consult a pharmacist in the neighborhood. Only after trying the cures suggested by these people is she likely to seek a doctor. 8

During a single illness as many as twenty-five remedies or treatments may be tried, with the only criterion for judging their quality being their immediate effectiveness. When the ill person becomes well, the last medicine or treatment used is assumed effective, and is heartily recommended to others having similar symptoms. In cities, delay in seeking modern health care may be lengthened because of the increased number of non-medical sources of health advice.

These examples show two basic features of health behavior in Guatemala. First is the typical progression from the cheapest and most accessible care to treatment that is more expensive and harder to make use of. Second, given the greater social distance (though not necessarily physical distance) between users and public health providers, use of their services occurs only when more familiar sources prove ineffective.


CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

A hierarchically arranged system of public health services is common in Latin American countries. The basic inequality in health care availability to various social classes is demonstrated by the proportion of national resources that are invested in the upper levels of this pyramid. These sophisticated and specialized services consume great amounts of financial and human resources, and are limited in their spatial impact. Although claims are often made that such facilities administer to "referrals," in fact such referrals are few. These specialized facilities provide care to the foreign and indigenous elites; they are "showcases" often used for prestige purposes and are inaccessible to most of the population. Greater effort must be made to broaden the base of the health care hierarchy--to apply "appropriate technology" to health care demands. Social welfare considerations

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Care Patterns and Planning in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.