Health Care Patterns and Planning in Developing Countries

By Rais Akhtar | Go to book overview

government is seriously exploring the possibility of introducing health insurance schemes appropriate to the conditions of the country.

Thus far, the Rawlings government's commitment to the policy of involving traditional healers in the National Health Care Delivery System remains at the rhetorical stage. Several problems continue to plague the successful implementation of the primary health care strategy, which is yet to be implemented in several districts in the country.


CONCLUSIONS

Health care facilities in Ghana have increased considerably over the years. The major problem is that their distribution in the country has been grossly unequal. Inter-regional, intra-regional and rural-urban disparities continue to exist, owing essentially to the fact that the limited resources for them are frequently located on the basis of political and economic expediency rather than on careful analysis of the relative needs of the different sections of the country. Until recently, the Western-oriented health care model established by the colonialists had informed the policies and strategies of health authorities in post-independence Ghana.

The government should pay much attention to traditional medical services in the country. Efforts should be made to organise the local medical practitioners to contribute to the current programme of health for all by the year 2000. Avenues need to be explored as to how best traditional medical practitioners can be integrated into the national health care delivery system. The Centre for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine should be given adequate funding for continued research into local herbs and possible manufacture of local drugs.

Structural changes in the health care system are beginning to emerge from the current health policies being adopted by the Rawlings government. Efforts should be made to mobilise communities to contribute their quota to general health improvement in the country instead of relying solely on the government for the provision of medical services, healthy environments, better housing and a higher standard of living. Health education, family planning and primary health care programmes should be given sustained priority by the government.


NOTES
1.
See Abaka Pobee K., "The Health Policy of the PNDC," Legon Observer, April 1982, p. 91.
2.
A. Kleinman, Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture: An Exploration of the Borderland Between Anthropology Medicine and Psychiatry, University of California Press, Berkeley, 1980, pp. 50-60.
3.
For a discussion on therapy managing groups, see J. M. Janzen (with W. W. Arkinstall), The Quest for Therapy in Lower Zaire, University of California Press, Berkeley, 1978.
4.
H. Fabrega, "The Scope of Ethnomedical Science," Cult. Med. Psychiatry 1, 1977.

-240-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Care Patterns and Planning in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.