Homelessness in the United States--Data and Issues

By Jamshid A. Momeni | Go to book overview

Specific suggestions for increased action include increasing the availability of surplus food, providing more cash directly to meal providers, including soup kitchens and shelters in the food distribution system that now serves the school lunch/breakfast program (to ensure that they not only get the basic commodities available through USDA, but also the expanded list of foods available to school feeding sites), and expanding funding for the central kitchens that prepare home- delivered meals for the elderly and disabled so that they can prepare additional meals for the homeless to be distributed through the use of mobile "food wagons." This last suggestion would help bring food to those shown in our study to have the lowest and least nutritious food consumption, those homeless on the streets who do not use any meal or shelter facilities.


NOTES
1.
The full study report may be obtained from The Urban Institute library, 2100 M Street N.W., Washington, DC 20037. Martha R. Burt and Barbara E. Cohen, Feeding the Homeless: Does the Prepared Meals Provision Help? Volume I: Report to Congress; Volume II: Supporting Tables and Documentation. The study was supported by Contracts No. 53-3198-6-41 and 53-3198-7-101 with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Office of Analysis and Evaluation.
2.
See Burt and Cohen's chapter in this volume for the study's findings related to the sociodemographic characteristics of the homeless.
3.
See Burt and Cohen's chapter in this volume.
4.
Because the interviewers only had 7-8 minutes to complete all food-related questions, the recording of foods eaten during the previous day is necessarily less precise than with a standard 24-hour recall procedure. Results cannot therefore be interpreted as precise measures of diet quality, since no assessment was possible of nutrient quantities. However, examining the variety of foods eaten by the homeless is informative, especially when looking at the proportion of the homeless whose daily intake does or does not include foods from each of the five core food groups.

REFERENCES

Burt Martha R., and Barbara E. Cohen. 1988. Feeding the Homeless: Does the Prepared Meals Provision Help? Volume I: Report to Congress; Volume II: Supporting Tables and Documentation. Washington, D.C.: The Urban Institute.

Human Nutrition Information Service, USDA. 1980. Food Intakes and Nutrients, Individuals in One Day in the U.S., Spring 1977. Preliminary Report #2. Hyattsville, Md: HNIS-USDA.

-60-

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Homelessness in the United States--Data and Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1: Counting the Homeless 1
  • Conclusion 13
  • References 15
  • 2: A Sociodemographic Profile of the Service-Using Homeless: Findings from a National Survey 17
  • References 36
  • 3: Food Sources and Intake of Homeless Persons 39
  • References 60
  • 4: Drug Abuse among Homeless People 61
  • References 76
  • 5: Homelessness as a Long-Term Housing Problem in America 81
  • References 90
  • 6: A Social-Psychiatric Perspective on Homelessness: Results from a Pittsburgh Study 95
  • Conclusions 107
  • References 108
  • References 108
  • References 108
  • 7: Sweat and Blood: Sources of Income on a Southern Skid Row 111
  • References 121
  • 8: Homeless Children and Their Caretakers 123
  • References 132
  • 9: Programs Dealing with Homelessness in the United States, Canada, and Britain 133
  • Conclusions 150
  • Acknowledgments 151
  • References 151
  • 10: Public Policies for Reducing Homelessness in America 153
  • Conclusion 163
  • Note 163
  • References 163
  • 11: No Place to Go: A National Picture of Homelessness in America 165
  • References 182
  • Select Bibliography 185
  • Index 191
  • About the Contributors 195
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