The Yankee West: Community Life on the Michigan Frontier

By Susan E. Gray | Go to book overview

Introduction. The Yankee West and the "Universal Yankee Nation"

This is the story of three townships on the antebellum southwestern Michigan frontier. Richland, Climax, and Alamo are located in Kalamazoo County and are roughly equidistant from Kalamazoo, formerly Bronson, the county seat. Throughout the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth, the economy of the townships was agricultural. None of the villages established in the townships--Gull Corners (later Richland), Climax Corners, and Alamo Center--ever became more than low-level centers for the exchange of goods and services. The townships acquired inhabitants in a manner consistent with their development as farming communities; the population of each grew from a few hundred souls in the 1830s, the first decade of settlement, to roughly 2,000 individuals by 1880, then stabilized. One could write the early history of Richland, Climax, and Alamo as the mundane march of the farm boy who collects the herd in the back forty and drives it resolutely toward the barn and not be far from the mark, except for two considerations: the circumstances under which the townships were settled were by no means mundane, and the settlers saw themselves as anything but plodders.

Richland, Climax, and Alamo are located near the heart of a culture region known in the late nineteenth century as "Greater New England," more recently as "Yankeeland," and in this work as the "Yankee West." In the nineteenth century, this region extended west from New England along

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Yankee West: Community Life on the Michigan Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.