The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917

By Jon Gjerde | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
The Prospects of the West

A Promise and a Threat

The westward migration across the Appalachian range in the antebellum era was a phenomenon of singular importance to the development of the United States. Despite ebbs and flows in its rate of growth, the white population in the western territories increased inexorably from the onset of migration until the Civil War. At one time a frontier of minor consequence to the American Republic, the Middle West quickly became a region of central importance to the future of the United States. The white population of the Old Northwest, which was slightly more than a quarter of a million in 1810, had increased sixfold twenty years later to number about 1.5 million. 1 In the three decades prior to the Civil War, moreover, the five states in the Old Northwest expanded to nearly 7 million inhabitants, an increase, as William Petersen points out, that exceeded the white population growth in the two centuries between the founding of Jamestown and the Louisiana Purchase. 2 As new territories were opened up to white invasion, the journeys reached farther west. By 1860, Iowa and Minnesota contained nearly 1 million white inhabitants. The states in the region, the oldest of which was a mere fifty-seven years old, thus contained over one-quarter of the American population on the eve of the Civil War.

The bulk of this migration was predicated on the opportunities inherent in the western territories. As farmers moved west, they purchased parcels from a vast cache of land on which they planted crops or anticipated profits from speculation. During the frenzied buying between 1835 and 1837, 38 million acres of land -- nearly 60,000 square miles -- were alienated from government ownership. Twenty years later, amid the peak years of land acquisition, nearly twice as much land -- 65 million acres --

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.