The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917

By Jon Gjerde | Go to book overview

Mount Carmel, six miles north of Carroll, contained over 200 German Catholic families in 1877, mostly from Dubuque County, and was known among Americans tellingly as "the Catholic settlement." 90 The town of Carroll in 1877 contained 80 German Catholic families; Hillsdale, eight miles south, had another 120 German Catholic families; and satellite settlements were forming throughout Carroll County and in neighboring regions. "Such," concluded a correspondent to Die Iowa, "is the increase in Catholicity in western Iowa." 91

Although ties among the American-born were less noticeable on ethnic maps, old middle western ties remained a force that continued to link migrations toward the arid West. The migration from Clinton County, Iowa, in the extreme eastern part of the state to Sac County in the west was so large that a township in Sac County was named Clinton, after the migrants' old home. 92 A similar thread reached from Dubuque County, slightly north of Clinton County, to Ida County, just west of Sac County. After visiting the western Iowa residents, a friend and former neighbor reported in a local paper that they now owned 1,900 acres of improved land. 93 And even as migration moved into the semiarid reaches of Nebraska, some old ties remained intact and new ones were formed. Representing a new ethnic definition, the "Iowa colony" was formed in the Niobrara country of the Nebraska sandhills. 94

Perhaps based at first on the yearning for reunion, then, chain migrations created a human matrix throughout the Middle West that linked people with common pasts and ultimately offered them social and economic benefits. Settlements that contained former acquaintances and family members often offered opportunities to work and accumulate capital for wages that were usually higher than those in Europe. Economic aid continued. One immigrant who arrived in 1892 at a destination common to many of his friends and kin remembered that he received all the supplies he needed on credit. 95 Economic betterment, in sum, was often more readily found under the auspices of kin than through the individual pursuit of wealth.


Conclusion

Various songs at mid-century proclaimed that the migration to the nineteenth-century rural Middle West was a decision individuals often made to improve their economic circumstances. Yet the personal calculus for the decision to migrate was not so simple. When contemplating the move west, potential migrants were forced to consider the world they would leave behind, including their familial responsibilities for parents

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.