English Literature in the Twentieth Century

By J. W. Cunliffe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTORY

THE death of Queen Victoria in the first year of the twentieth century marks with a convenient definiteness the beginning of a new age. In international politics England's position of "splendid isolation" was abandoned in favor of an entente cordiale with France, which the new sovereign, Edward VII, had a considerable share in arranging. Great Britain had emerged from the Boer War victorious, but with diminished prestige; the German Emperor's congratulatory cablegram to President Kruger had aroused British animosity, and the British Government's counter stroke of sending the White Squadron out into the North Sea had excited German fears. Germany set about the increase of her own fleet to a strength that caused further irritation of British susceptibilities, and Europe seemed to be divided into two armed camps. All that the diplomatists could do was to defer the outbreak of the inevitable conflict to 1914.

The Great War suspended every peaceful human activity, and reduced the arts, including literature, almost to silence. Indeed the period for all Europe might be divided into pre-war and post-war, for the whole world is still suffering from the results of the disaster. The delicately balanced economic and financial relations by which the world's business was carried on were upset and have not yet recovered their equilibrium.

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English Literature in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I - Introductory 1
  • Chapter II - Victorian Survivors 21
  • Bibliography 36
  • Chapter III - George Bernard Shaw (1856- ) 45
  • Bibliography 86
  • Chapter IV - Shaw's Successors 89
  • Bibliography - (dates of Production) 99
  • Chapter V - The Irish Renaissance 100
  • Bibliography 122
  • Chapter VI - Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) 125
  • Bibliography 137
  • Chapter VII - Herbert George Wells (1866- ) 139
  • Bibliography 161
  • Chapter VIII - John Galsworthy (1867-1933) 163
  • Bibliography 183
  • Chapter IX - Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) 185
  • Bibliography 199
  • Chapter X - Georgian Novelists 201
  • Bibliography 254
  • Chapter XI - Essays, Journalism and Travel 259
  • Chapter XII - Lytton Strachey 281
  • Chapter XIII - Masefield and the New Georgian Poets 292
  • Bibliography 330
  • Index 335
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