Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993

By Timothy J. Colton; Jerry F. Hough | Go to book overview

Table 9-16. Perception of Bias in Central Television by Partisan Choice
Percent
Radical
reformist
Moderate
reformist
CentristNationalistSocialist
Bias detected
Yes 20 26 23 27 31
No 42 38 39 32 26
Hard to say 37 37 37 41 43
Direction of biasa
Antigovernment 15 8 11 12 9
Antiopposition 45 50 42 50 58
Anti-other groups 21 19 32 17 21
Hard to say 19 23 15 21 12
a.Among those who perceived bias in coverage of the campaign by central television.

partisan messages of 1993, and the mass of newly empowered citizens who tried to make sense of them, who must bear responsibility for the outcome of Russia's first post-Soviet election, for better or for worse.


Notes
1.
See especially Paul F. Lazarsfeld, Bernard Berelson, and Hazel Gaudet, The People's Choice: How the Voter Makes up His Mind in a Presidential Campaign, 2nd ed. ( Columbia University Press, 1948), and Elihu Katz and Paul F. Lazarsfeld, Personal Influence: The Part Played by People in the Flow of Mass Communications ( Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1955).
2.
Samuel L. Popkin, The Reasoning Voter. Communication and Persuasion in Presidential Campaigns ( University of Chicago Press, 1991), p. 217. On the neglect of media effects in American election studies of the 1950s and 1960s, see Herbert F. Weisberg, "Model Choice in Political Science: The Case of Voting Behavior Research, 1946-1975," in Herbert F. Weisberg, ed., Political Science: The Science of Politics ( New York: Agathon Press, 1986), pp. 297-98. An excellent recent study from outside the American field is Scott C. Flanagan, "Media Influences and Voting Behavior," in Scott C. Flanagan and others, The Japanese Voter ( Yale University Press, 1991), pp. 297-331.
3.
Ninety-three percent of the Soviet population regularly viewed television in 1986, versus 5 percent in 1960 (and 98 percent in the United States in the 1980s). Radio use, on the other hand, declined in the late Soviet period, and in 1979 there were only 54 radio sets per 100 population (versus more than 200 in the United States). Ellen Mickiewiecz, Split Signals: Television and Politics in the Soviet Union ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), pp. 3, 17.

-288-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 750

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.