Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993

By Timothy J. Colton; Jerry F. Hough | Go to book overview

ric is that it appears to have offset the antigovernment impulse among those voters who were well versed in the constitution--and presumably relatively well versed in party politics, too. In such urbane circles, the net effect was a lack of systematic connection between support of the Liberal Democrats and the referendum choice. Among constitutional unsophisticates, though, there was a palpable negative correlation, and it is this that creates the total effect.


Conclusion

Of all the acts of political engineering attempted by Yeltsin's government in 1993, the constitutional referendum was the most audacious and the most successful. It succeeded because its initiator managed to piece together the kind of winning coalition that eluded him and his friends in the parliamentary election. The coalition for ratification was informed by skimpy public knowledge about the intricacies of the constitution but by widespread and reasonably discerning knowledge about constitutionally charged issues. Although sociological and economic variables such as community size, living standard, ethnicity, and age were predictive of citizen choice, 24 attitudes were far more so. Strangely for a constitutional referendum, public opinion about nonconstitutional subjects mattered more than opinion about constitutional subjects, even among constitutional sophisticates. And surprisingly for a poll coinciding with the country's first multiparty election, the untried political parties were also able to serve as a compass to many participants in the referendum.

Russians, in sum, granted Yeltsin his fondest political wish at the same time that they frustrated the partisan plans of his most fervent partners and backers. The governing charter they put in place has allowed him and his associates to rule ever since by executive fiat, relegating the new parliament to a largely subsidiary role. The referendum founded both the relative political stability of the mid-1990s and rank uncertainty about the future of politics after Yeltsin, when the superpresidential machinery he crafted and the electorate accepted may yet fall into the hands of leaders pursuing non- democratic ends.


Notes
1.
Stephen Holmes, "Superpresidentialism and Its Problems," East European Constitutional Review, vol. 2/3 (Fall 1993/Winter 1994), p. 125.

-307-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 750

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.