The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

By George W. Perkins | Go to book overview

Translator's Preface

The translation is from the Gakushūin University Library text edited by Tokieda Motoki and Kidō Saizō in NKBT, which contains many helpful notes. Inoue Muneo Masukagami also proved extremely helpful in translating difficult passages and preparing notes. To avoid excessive annotation, names of personalities and places are identified in the glossary. As a rule, personalities are listed, both in the text and in the glossary, by first name; posthumous names of emperors and in several cases in names of imperial ladies are used for convenience. I have frequently abbreviated or deleted titles and offices, substituting the first name of the individual. The result is perhaps more clarity in the English than in the original, but the practice seemed justified by the excessively cumbersome nature of translated court titles. I have tried to leave titles intact in passages where they are relevant to the content, adding the first name of the individual where necessary for clarity. I have followed McCullough and McCullough ( 1980) in translating titles and offices, as well as clothing items and colors. I have elected not to include detailed notes on either; interested readers may consult the work above. Ages in the text follow the Japanese manner unless otherwise specified; dates in other sections are calculated in the Western manner.

I am particularly indebted to Professor Helen McCullough, who has kindly worked my earlier, lengthy introduction into a succinct yet informative discussion of the historical and literary background of the work, and whose extensive editing work on the text of my translation has resulted in many stylistic improvements without departing from the spirit of the original translation. I am also appreciative of Professors William McCullough, Makoto Ueda, and Susan Matisoff for many helpful suggestions during my initial study of Masukagami for the Ph.D. dissertation. I am, of course, solely responsible for any flaws in the final product.

-vii-

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The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translator's Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Figures and Tables xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Preface 27
  • Chapter One - Through Tangled Thickets 31
  • Chapter Two - the New Island Guard 46
  • Chapter Three - Mourning Attire 59
  • Chapter Four - Three Sacred Mountains 67
  • Chapter Five - Snow on the Central Plain 72
  • Chapter Six - Descending Clouds 82
  • Chapter Seven - Snow on the Northern Plain 89
  • Chapter Eight Asuka River 97
  • Chapter Nine Pillow of Grass 110
  • Chapter Ten Waves of Longevity 118
  • Chapter Eleven Ornamental Combs 136
  • Chapter Twelve Plovers by the Bay 156
  • Chapter Thirteen the Hills of Autumn 162
  • Chapter Fourteen a Farewell to Spring 174
  • Chapter Fifteen Wintry Showers 183
  • Chapter Sixteen 197
  • Chapter Seventeen the Dayflower 214
  • Reference Matter 221
  • Appendix: Title, Authorship, Date, Sources, and Texts 223
  • Notes 227
  • Glossary 267
  • Bibliography 319
  • Index 327
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