The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)

By George W. Perkins | Go to book overview

THE CLEAR MIRROR

Preface

On the fifteenth of the second month, the day when the Buddha's life ended in the crane grove, "like firewood utterly consumed by fire," I made a pilgrimage to the Shōryōji Temple in Saga, drawn by thoughts of the twice-transmitted memento of the Tathigata; and there I paid my respects with silent chants, such as "Ever am I on the Mount of the Numinous Eagle." 1 While I was thus engaged, an old nun came up beside me -- well over 80 by the look of her, leaning on a pigeon staff. 2 Presently, she sent off her attendant, a young woman whose appearance seemed appropriate to her mistress's status.

"I told myself I could manage, but this backache is unbearable," she said to her. "I'll have to spend the night in one of the rooms here. Go to the monks' quarters and speak to them about a sacred lamp." 3 After chanting the name of Śākyamuni Buddha several times, she turned her gaze to the brilliant evening light, which was flooding the hall. "Ah! It reminds me of myself-that sun just about to sink behind the mountains!" She leaned against a support, her figure conveying an indefinable suggestion of elegance and discernment.

I moved closer. "How far have you come? Shall I keep you company until your attendant returns?" I asked.

"I live near here, but the trip seemed endless. Maybe it's because I'm getting along in years. It's not easy, being old," she said.

"Might I ask your age?"

"It's so great that I myself can't really say: well over a hundred, anyway." With old-fashioned refinement, she continued, "This temple was the only place that survived unscathed during those bizarre disorders. 4 Most assuredly, it was thanks to the power of the holy Tathāgata."

Much impressed by her remarkable age, and well aware that such people were reputed to tell tales of earlier days, I pursued the conversation with enthusiasm. "I've always wanted to learn things about the past -- always hoped

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translator's Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Figures and Tables xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Preface 27
  • Chapter One - Through Tangled Thickets 31
  • Chapter Two - the New Island Guard 46
  • Chapter Three - Mourning Attire 59
  • Chapter Four - Three Sacred Mountains 67
  • Chapter Five - Snow on the Central Plain 72
  • Chapter Six - Descending Clouds 82
  • Chapter Seven - Snow on the Northern Plain 89
  • Chapter Eight Asuka River 97
  • Chapter Nine Pillow of Grass 110
  • Chapter Ten Waves of Longevity 118
  • Chapter Eleven Ornamental Combs 136
  • Chapter Twelve Plovers by the Bay 156
  • Chapter Thirteen the Hills of Autumn 162
  • Chapter Fourteen a Farewell to Spring 174
  • Chapter Fifteen Wintry Showers 183
  • Chapter Sixteen 197
  • Chapter Seventeen the Dayflower 214
  • Reference Matter 221
  • Appendix: Title, Authorship, Date, Sources, and Texts 223
  • Notes 227
  • Glossary 267
  • Bibliography 319
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.