Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview
3.
all of the thousands of different occupations as a part of one experiment. Even 100 occupations seems to be beyond the limits of ability and/or motivation of many people and longer lists offer apparently insurmountable obstacles to even more people. Cf. Smith, op cit., for description of projected scale based on ratings of 700 occupations on a 100-point scale.
4.
The standard error, or σav, is a measure of variation in the observed mean of a plural number of values. Its size is dependent on the standard deviation, not presented in the Table, and on the number of values comprising the observed mean. It reveals the limits of probable variation of other means of other plural numbers of values of the same size. A total of 1000 of each 1000 means, each of which is based on the same number of values as the observed mean, are expected to lie within 3 σav. on either side of the observed.

5. OCCUPATIONAL COMPOSITION OF SOCIAL CLASSES

· W. L. Warner, Marcia Meeker, and Kenneth Eells


Occupation: Revised Scale

The occupational scale . . . show(s) a high correlation between occupational ratings and [Evaluative Participation]. However, after the work on these data was completed, further modifications were made. Experience with this revised form of the occupational scale suggests that it is an improvement over the original form and that it should be used in future applications of the ["Index of Status Characteristics"] method.

The modified classification resulted when it was decided to treat occupation as a two-dimensional factor and to use the various occupational groups which had been defined by Edwards, [and] to accept the fact that there were gradations within each of these groups with respect to degree of skill required for the job and the amount of prestige attached to the job. Because this form of classification was more fluid, the job of classification became easier and at the same time more accurate. Thus, any category of occupation was not limited to a single rating but could potentially be given a rating of from one to seven, depending upon the degree of skill required for a particular job rather than that associated with a general occupational group.

____________________
EDITORS' NOTE: W. Lloyd Warner and associates determined the social class position of persons by an elaborate method of asking people to evaluate the social place of others. They called this the Evaluative Participation technique. As a short cut to this technique they developed an Index of Status Characteristics in which status dimensions of occupation, education, housing, and other characteristics of the individual were summarized. In classifying the occupations according to status levels, they found Edwards' classification unsatisfactory. Here they describe how they converted the Edwards classification to one useful for their Index.

-273-

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