Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

teachers from one type of school to another so that a type of equilibrium is achieved.

Floro indicates that the same kind of dynamics are found among city managers.3 Here norms are developed around the concept of "the right amount of job movement." The city manager should not remain for too long or too short a period in his job. He must be aware of the dangers of overinvolvement and underinvolvement in the local community in order to be able to practice his occupation with a minimum amount of tension and at the same time make orderly moves from one type of city to another. In Chapter XIV additional career patterns are described for the physician, railroader, telephone worker, nurse, and union leader. They emphasize important elements in the subculture which condition not only occupational changes but also their distinctive styles of living.


NOTES
1.
Delbert C. Miller and William H. Form, Industrial Sociology, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1951, Chaps. 15-19.
2.
Ibid.
3.
George K. Floro, "Continuity in City-Manager Careers," The American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 61, November 1955, pp. 240-246.

1. OCCUPATIONAL CAREER PATTERN AS A SOCIOLOGICAL INSTRUMENT ·

William H. Form and Delbert C. Miller

Apart from statistical treatment of occupational trends, only a few studies have attempted to analyze and compare different occupational levels.1

This paper presents a research attempt to measure and compare the socioeconomic levels for some patterns of adjustment. The levels used are adapted from Alba Edwards' census classification of occupations in seven groups. . . . During 1946 a sample of 276 occupational histories were gathered which would match the gainfully employed population of Ohio as to occupational distribution, age and sex distribution of workers, and occupational distribution by sex.2 Care was taken to secure complete histories of every single paid part-time or full-time job the respondents could recall. Then each occupation was classified as belonging in one of the seven levels. These data were gathered (1) to [develop a method which measures] the occupational security that a worker experiences in his work history; (2) to discover the relationship between occupational mobility and occupational security for each socioeconomic grouping of workers; and (3) to examine how certain social factors may be related to the typical career patterns of different occupational levels.

-287-

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