Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview
persons to inherit their father's occupation or climb above it. Children of manual workers inherit their father's occupation or fall below it.
b. Above the manual level, the higher the education of the father the greater are the chances for the children to experience occupational and educational upward mobility.
c. White-collar and skilled workers seem to provide their children backgrounds conducive to better adjustments and greater security in their future occupational histories. The reverse tends to be true for other manual workers.

Future Research
Several questions concerning this area of study may be raised as suggestions for future research.
1. Are socioeconomic groupings meaningful social classifications? Is the range within them so large as to invalidate comparisons between levels?
2. How does income change with occupational mobility? Are differences in security and insecurity job-patterns accompanied by income changes?
3. Would larger and better samples of a regional type change the essential conclusions reached?
4. How are the occupational career patterns of different levels affected by economic cycles and other social change?
5. What are the social psychological concomitants of security-insecurity job patterns? For example, do the levels differ in the amount and type of community participation?10 What kind of social adjustments accompany work periods and changes in work periods?

NOTES
1.
H. D. Anderson and P. E. Davidson are the outstanding contributors in this field. Cf. Occupational Mobility in an American Community ( 1937); Occupational Trends in the United States ( 1940); Ballots and the American Class Struggle ( 1943), all published in Palo Alto by the Stanford University Press. See also P. Sorokin, Social Mobility, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1927.
2.
For a complete description of the sampling technique see D. C. Miller and W. H. Form, "Measuring Patterns of Occupational Security," Sociometry, Vol. 10, November 1947, p. 366.
3.
This is not the reflection of the different number of years of work experienced in the occupational levels. A comparison of the relative "security" positions of the levels for those having more than ten years of occupational experience with those having less than ten years' experience reveals no statistically significant differences. For additional data see Ibid., pp. 372-373.
4.
It may be of interest to note that if the index of security is calculated without the initial period included, that is, the ranking of

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