Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

that only 23 per cent of today's professional men were drawn from professional fathers.

Table 3 indicates also that sons in a given occupational stratum tend to be drawn most heavily from fathers in the same or a closely contiguous stratum . . . but that sons are also characteristically drawn more heavily from certain strata than others. For example, whereas substantial proportions of sons in nearly every stratum had fathers whose occupation was skilled labor, comparatively small percentages of sons in other than the unskilled stratum had fathers who were unskilled, and likewise few sons in any stratum had fathers in either the large business, the professional, or the white-collar strata. The determinants of these relations can only be guessed at, of course, but the two main factors would probably be found in the changing requirements of the productive economy for workers at various levels, and in the differing numbers supplied to the population by the fathers of the various occupational strata, and from which the labor force can be ultimatly drawn.


NOTES
1.
R. Centers, "Attitude and Belief in Relation to Occupational Stratifications," Journal of Social Psychology, in press.
2.
P. Sorokin, Social Mobility, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1927.
3.
Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1937.
4.
Cf. Table 4 and page 23 of their Occupational Mobility.
5.
Because the occupational station of Farm Owners and Managers is such a broad grouping it is difficult to locate it in any precise way on a scale of levels composed mainly of urban groups. Since it is a better occupational level than many white-collar workers occupy, but poorer than that occupied by many skilled workers, its overlapping with these makes it desirable to include it where they function as adjacent levels.
6.
S. H. Britt, The Social Psychology of Modern Life, New York: Rinehart & Co., Inc., 1941, p. 329.

2. OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS ELITES ·

W. Lloyd Warner and James C. Abegglen

The data on which the results of this study are based deal with the backgrounds and careers of men holding chief executive positions in the largest firms in each of business and industry in America. Some 8300 questionnaire responses were obtained from these men, representing the total population of business leaders; their accuracy was examined; and the responses were analyzed. The questionnaire was devised to provide critical information on present-day business leaders in light of the study's objectives, as well as to ensure a maximum of accurate comparison with the 1928 results as set forth by Taussig and Joslyn.

. . . Table 1 presents the distribution of respondents by father's occupa-

-343-

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