Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

overlapping career patterns, and converging life styles, they are increasingly aware of their common fate and are forging a common program of action.

Many scholars believe that Mills's triad is an oversimplification of the problem of power. The political pluralists, among others, insist that no single occupation or combination of occupations have power over the direction of the economy and the society. Riesman, Bell, Rossi, and Dahl insist that the United States has a "mushy" social structure and that decision-making cannot be centralized into a single power elite. They assert that veto groups can stall the action of allegedly powerful interests and that even highly organized minorities can realize their will against complacent powerful groups. And Galbraith feels that the countervailing forces will counteract the efforts of any one group to take over the control of the American economy.6

The problem of empirically determining which occupations have greater dominance and power at various stages of industrial development remains complex and knotty in a highly dynamic economy with historical roots in a free market. In all advanced industrial societies the problem of maintaining a stable internal and external equilibrium has called for an increasing amount of political centralization of control in all areas of life.


NOTES
1.
Emile Durkheim, The Division of Labor in Society, translated by George Simpson, Glencoe: The Free Press, 1949.
2.
Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1937.
3.
University of North Carolina-Press, 1953.
4.
Adolph A. Berle, Jr., and Gardner C. Means, The Modern Corporation and Private Property, Chicago: Commerce Clearing House Inc., 1932.
5.
Ibid., p. 357.
6.
John Kenneth Galbraith, American Capitalism, London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd., 1957.

1. THE SOCIAL ALLOCATION OF OCCUPATIONS: A FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS ·

Kingsley Davis and
Wilbert E. Moore

In the present paper a further stop in stratification theory is undertaken--an attempt to show the relationship between stratification and the rest of the social order.1 Starting from the proposition that no society is "classless," or unstratified, an effort is made to explain in functional terms, the universal necessity which calls forth stratification in any social system. Next, an attempt is made to explain the roughly uniform distribution of prestige as between the major types of positions in every society. Since, however, there occur between one society and another great differ-

-375-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 618

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.