Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

the favorite college course that almost led to a different choice of job; often, of course, he's thinking of a little business of his own.

The man indulging in these reveries is by no means a failure; much more frequently he is quite successful--and therein lies part of his restlessness. First, like most people who are very good at one thing, he does indeed possess aptitudes, however latent, for quite different kinds of work. For another thing, his success may pall just a little bit more than he ever thought it would. In these days of super-prosperity, his big paycheck does not seem the achievement it would have been in more difficult times. More and more he begins to wonder if his work is enough fun. Before he gets much older, he thinks, he will get around to that second career. But he won't. Fortune interviewed a cross section of executives, corporations, and management consultants, and found scarcely any clear-cut cases of executives turning to entirely new careers in business or the professions.2

When he think it over, apparently, the executive comes to the conclusion that he has made much too large an investment in his present work. It is not merely the company ties and the entrapment of pension and retirement-fund plans--many executives do shift from one company to another. What may be the main factor is the executive's realization that he will be abandoning much of the capital his present skills represent, and he is enough of a realist to know that the difficulty of mastering a new job--and the risks--is a little too great. Still, it has been a solace, and once in a while he can pause to think what a hell of a job he could have done if it hadn't been for all those other things.


NOTES
1.
M.I.T.'s School of Industrial Management has observed interesting differences between the Sloan Fellows, young executives usually under thirty-five, and the Senior Executive Group of forty-five-to-fifty-year olds. "The Sloan Fellows just know that they are going up and will get there," said one M.I.T. faculty member. "The senior executives wonder whether their efforts are worth making. Their questioning isn't questioning of the system--though they got the full shock of the depression--but rather of a moral, ethical, philosophical kind: their concern is how it all fits together."
2.
In defining "second careers" Fortune included only businessmen between forty and sixty; under forty is still a period of youthful job changing, over-sixty shifts get mixed up with impending retirement.

5. WHEN WORKERS AND CUSTOMERS MEET ·

William F. Whyte

When workers and customers meet, in the service industries, that relationship adds a new dimension to the pattern of human relations in industry. When the customer takes an active part in business activity, the whole organization must be adjusted to his behavior.

-467-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 618

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.