Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

marriage, however, is generally approved. "I feel the fact that I worked before marriage," says one wife, "is a help. I know what goes on in an office and can understand what Charles is up against."

College? Here is the summum bonum. There are some obvious reasons; because virtually all executives now go to college, the couple in such cases start off with shared values. But corporation people mention a reverse factor almost as much. It is not so important for the wife, they say, to have gone to college: but it is very important not to have not gone to college. If she hasn't, corporation people warn, she is prey to an inferiority complex that makes it difficult for her to achieve real poise. Some corporations, accordingly, make it their business to find out whether or not the wife has a degree.

The corporation would seem to have reason for optimism. Since more girls are going to college, the proportion of executives' wives who are college graduates has been steadily increasing. In part, as a result of this, the problem of the outgrown wife appears to be less acute among the younger wives.

And the omens in some other respects would seem as good. The younger wives are afflicted with all of the old problems of adjustment-- and some new ones of the corporation's own making--but rarely has there emerged a generation of wives so dedicated to the job of grappling with them. On almost every point of contact--from entertaining to moving across the continent, their background is making them the most tractable material the corporation has ever had.

What does the corporation plan to do with it? That is another story. And one, . . . that also has implications for American life beyond the sphere of the corporation itself.


NOTE
1.
In the opinion of at least one psychologist, there is a vicious-circle effect that further confounds the problem. "I've had a number of executives whose job effectiveness is impaired because they are sexually frustrated. It is possible that these men have drained off their energy through worry over the job so much they are no longer any good as lovers. This makes them worry even more. One excellent man I've had to study is losing his grip fast. His wife's an outgoing, attractive gal who now finds him lacking sexually. She's now practically an alcoholic."

5. ETHNIC RELATIONS IN INDUSTRY AND SOCIETY ·

Everett C. Hughes

A number of sociologists about two decades ago focused their studies of race relations on ethnic divisions of labor found in the colonial regions of the world which capitalistic industry had but recently penetrated.1 More recently American sociologists have joined in study of race relations in

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