Shakespeare at the Globe, 1599-1609

By Bernard Beckerman | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1
C. W. Wallace, The First London Theatre (Lincoln, Neb., 1913), p. 24.
2
Gerald E. Bentley, "Shakespeare and the Blackfriars Theatre", Shakespeare Survey, I ( 1948), p. 47.
3
Peter Streete agreed, in this contract dated January 8, 1600, to complete his construction by July 25, 1600 ( E. K. Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage ( Oxford, 1923), II, p. 438), a period of about twenty-eight weeks. However, it was covenanted that "the saide Peeter Streete shall not be chardged with anie manner of pay[ntin]ge in or aboute the saide fframe howse or Stadge or anie parte thereof, nor rendringe the walls within"( Chambers, II, p. 437). Consequently, we must add to the twenty-eight weeks an indeterminate period during which the playhouse was painted, thus bringing the estimated completion of the Fortune to some time in August at least. It is probable that in computing the schedule for the Fortune, Streete utilized his experience at the Globe, particularly since the new stage was to be so much like the Globe's. Streete would find such computation easy after allowing for differences in building conditions. On the one hand the fact that the timber from the Theatre was to be used for the Globe suggests that the frame for the Globe took less time to erect. On the other hand, the fact that the Globe had to be built on piles might reasonably suggest that laying its foundations required more time. If Henslowe's notation of payment "to the laberers at the eand of the fowndations the 8 of maye 1600" ( Philip Henslowe, Papers, ed. W. W. Greg, p. 10), correctly reflects the time consumed in erecting these of the Fortune, a matter of about sixteen weeks, then we must assume that the base of the Globe was not ready to take a frame until the middle of June. As Henslowe Diary and Papers indicate, Streete probably consummated his portion of the contract somewhat later than he had estimated, that is, about the first week in August ( Henslowe, p. 11). But even if there were some delay, as Greg believes, Streete had erred merely by a matter of two weeks. I believe that his initial estimate, fundamentally reliable, reflected his experience at the Globe.
4
Among others Heminges testified that he shared in profits from the presentation of plays at Blackfriars for four years previous to 1612( Kirkham vs. Painton, as reprinted in F. G. Fleay, A Chronicle History of the London Stage ( London, 1890), pp. 225, 235, 238, 244, 249). The only time when the plague bills declined sufficiently to permit the possibility of performances was in March, 1609. The weekly count of plague deaths was thirty-two as of March 2, forty-three as of March 9, and thirty-three as of March 16. Thereafter, the plague increased in severity and the weekly number of deaths fell below forty only once again before December, 1609. (Statistics from John Bell, London's Remembrancer ( London, 1665) as reprinted in J. T. Murray, English Dramatic Companies ( London, 1910), II, pp. 186-187.)

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Shakespeare at the Globe, 1599-1609
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter One - The Repertory 1
  • Chapter Two - The Dramaturgy 24
  • Chapter Three - The Stage 63
  • Chapter Four - The Acting 109
  • Chapter Five - The Staging 157
  • Chapter Six - The Style 214
  • Appendix A 217
  • Appendix B 220
  • Appendix C 226
  • Notes 232
  • Index to the Globe Plays 245
  • General Index 248
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