Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Editorial boards of various learned journals have generously accorded their permission to republish certain representative essays, reports of scientific investigations, and discussions of phychological topics. The subscript at the end of a title indicates that the article originally appeared in print elsewhere and refers to the list of acknowledgments given below. It is hoped that the republication, in book form, will bring the article in question before a wider audience than it might find if it were confined to a scientific journal.Where no subscript appears after a title the article is appearing in print for the first time.
1. Psychology's Progress and the Armchair Taboo, by D. B. Klein, is reprinted from the PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW, Vol. 49, 1942, by permission.
2. Nazi Science, by David P. Boder, is reprinted from the CHICAGO JEWISH FORUM, Vol. I, 1942, by permission.
3. A Theory of Human Motivation, by A. H. Maslow, is reprinted from the PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW, Vol. 50, 1943, by permission.
4. The Conceptual Focus of Some Psychological Systems, by Egon Brunswik , is reprinted from the JOURNAL OF UNIFIED SCIENCE (Erkenntnis), Vol. 8, 1939, by permission.
5. Personality and Typology, by Isidor Chein, is reprinted from the JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 18, 1943, by permission.
6. Identification and the Post-War World, by Edward Chace Tolman, is reprinted from the JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 38, 1943, by permission.
7. The Concept of Social Status, by Raymond B. Cattell, is reprinted from the JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 15, 1942, by permission.
8. Identification with Social and Economic Class, by Hadley Cantril, is reprinted from the JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 38, 1943, by permission.

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