Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

NAZI SCIENCE

DAVID P. BODER

Illinois Institute of Technology and Psychological Museum

There is a fundamental aspect of Nazi anti-Semitism which places it in a class by itself: it is an onslaught without a chance for the victim to surrender. The pogrom regime of the Tsars, confronted the Jew with the sword in one hand and the "olive branch" (conversion) in the other. However, the Nazis feared to give to the Jews of Germany such an alternative. They were afraid that the "scape-goat" might escape. Unlike the Tsars, they did not need anti-Semitism as a theory for the justification of an existing order or for the defense of an economic class. Fascism is by no means "conservative." It is a movement toward the creation of a new order, a new ruling minority, armed to the teeth, which would divest capital and labor alike of any right to participate in the economic and social life of the nation beyond the needs of the duling band. In short, it is a movement to enslave their own people.

The strategy of the Nazi party was, from the beginning, very similar to the now familiar strategy of its war-machine. Its first movement was a pincer attack upon the life and liberty of the German nation. As it is obvious now, the Nazi attacks upon the Versailles treaty, upon the Jews, upon religion, upon communism, were skilfully planned thrusts designed to destroy the liberal foundations of the Weimar constitution. Playing some of their intended victims against others, they got men like Thyssen to arrange "loans" for the Nazi party from financial circles out-

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