Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview
industrial psychology in general. The tests, according to Jaensch, are devised by authors belonging to the anti-type, and favor the selection of anti-type individuals. The emphasis in industrial testing upon quick adaptability and ability to learn quickly favors the anti-type, since he, owing to his biological instability, shows greater readiness to shift attention, and to modify his behavior. This tendency toward modifiability makes him also a better and quicker learner. But these types. according to Jaensch, are also the disintegrators of culture and society; the penetration into industry of these "Possibly racial hybrids, latent carriers of tuberculosis, and offsprings of the large cities," together with the undeserved rejection of the J-type on account of his poorer test performance, has caused "great damage" to German industrial life.If we consider that most American school systems, many courts, numerous industries, and civil service commissions, and possibly the army, are using psychological tests, often very similar in principle to those used in pre-Hitler Germany, i.e. tests built on the work of Galton, Cattell, Binet, Stern, Terman, and Thorndike, we may conceive the breadth of the indictment, and its possible impact if used by a malicious demagogue.
CONCLUSIONS
Using a set of results of possibly bona fide psychological laboratory experiments, a presumably, reputable scientist builds a superstructure of inferences to prove:
1. That the Jews as a race, as well as a large number of Germans, are biologically unfit for a life compatible with the Destiny of the German people.
2. That German Culture for the last three centuries has been polluted by population groups who developed an irreparable biological inferiority due to heterogeneous mixtures of races (not exclusively with Jews), which facilitates the spread of tuberculosis and schizophrenia.
3. That these defects did not impair, but rather sharpened, the peculiar intelligence of the members of these groups, whom he finds justified in branding the anti-type. Moreover, because of their organic instability of ideals and general adaptability, persons of the anti-type have achieved political, economic, and scientific leadership.
4. That the Jews were not the cause of the appearance of such an anti-type, but rather that the gradual development of anti-type structure

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