Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

IDENTIFICATION AND THE POST-WAR WORLD1

EDWARD CHACE TOLMAN

University of California

One psychological process which seems to me to need especial emphasis in planning a post-war world is "identification." Identification was apparently first noted and named by Freud. But his conception became unnecessarily complicated and it was too closely bound up with his whole psychoanalytical system.2 I shall not here mean by identification, therefore, Freud's own concept, but merely a certain general neo-Freudian notion which seems now to be widely accepted by most psychologists and sociologists.3 Examining further this neo-Freudian notion we find that it really covers three somewhat different, though related, processes.

First, by identification may be meant the process wherein an individual tries to copy -- to take as his pattern or model -- some other older (or in some other way loked-up-to or envied) individual. This tendency is, of course, especially observable in children. It is the form of the process with which Freud was most concerned. He saw it primarily in the attempt of the small boy to mold himself after his father. The boy wishes to copy the father and (according to Freud) to replace the latter in the

____________________
1
The author regards the present contribution as an extension of the argument contained in his Drives toward war.
2
See, for example, the presentation of Freud's doctrine in Healey Bronner, and Bowers, The structure and meaning of psychoanalysis. New York: Knopf, 1930. Pp. 240-247.
3
Many who accept this general notion would, indeed, violently deny any direct Freudian affiliations.

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 714

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.