Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

TREATMENT OF A CASE OF ANXIETY HYSTERIA BY AN HYPNOTIC TECHNIQUE EMPLOYING PSYCHOANALYTIC PRINCIPLES

MARGARET BRENMAN AND MERTON M. GILL

The Menninger Clinic

Hypnosis is not very widely used in present-day psychiatric practice, though sporadic reports of remarkable "cures" appear periodically in the literature. With increasing frequency, suggestions are heard that hypnosis needs to be re-investigated and reevaluated in the light of the remarkable advances in psychodynamics that have taken place in the last half century. That striking psychological phenomena can be evoked through hynosis is unquestioned. It would seem then that in some way this powerful tool can be developed into an effective psychotherapeutic method.

Hypnosis was first used as a technique for alleviating symptoms by simply suggesting that they would disappear. The use of hypnosis for purposes of direct suggestion suffers all the usual disadvantages of a technique of symptomatic therapy, as contrasted with one aimed at the underlying etiology. Recurrences of the illness either in the original form or in a new one are very frequent.

It was Janet, Breuer and Freud who carried hypnosis from its use as a tool of suggestion to its employment as an aid in so- called cathartic hypnosis. One of Freud's famous early formulations was that "the hysteric suffers from reminiscences" and he utilized the hyperamnesia of hypnosis to recapture the traumatic memories. The re-living of memories in the hypnotic state with

-534-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 714

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.