Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

THE ARMY PERSONNEL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

WALTER V. BINGHAM The Adjutant General's Office, War Department

The personnel classification system of the United States Army, created during the first World War, has been streamlined during the past two years and adapted to the requirements of a highly complex, mobile, mechanized Army.1

Two main objectives of classification in a fast expanding military force are to conserve man power and to expedite training.2 In order to accomplish these missions, the personnel system is designed to facilitate correct initial placement of officers and soldiers, to maintain cumulative records of their subsequent experience and progress, and to provide a way of locating quickly at any time those who can do what has to be done at once--men able to undertake emergency duties or instantly to replace incapacitated members of combat teams.3 Each of these objectives, as we shall see has helped to shape army personnel practice.

____________________
1
Anonymous. "The Army Personnel System," Army and Navy Journal, LXXVIII, No. 41 ( June 14, 1941), 1149 ff. Committee on Classification of Personnel in the Army, The Personnel System of the U. S. Army, Vol. I: History of the Personnel System, pp. viii + 713; Vol. II: The Personnel Manual, pp. viii + 342; Washington: Superintendent of Public Documents, 1919.
2
Robert M. Yerkes. "Manpower and Military Effectiveness: The Case for Human Engineering," Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1941, 5, 205-209.
3
Walter V. Bingham. "Psychological Services in the Army," Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1941, 5, 221-24. Paul Van Riper Jr. "Personnel Administration in the United States Army," Public Personnel Review, 1941, 2, 199-210.

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