Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology

By Philip Lawrence Harriman | Go to book overview

THE PATIENT AND HIS PERSONALITY

A short discussion of the Rorschach method of personality evaluation and its uses in clinical medicine.

M. R. HARROWER-ERICKSON* Research Associate, Department of Neuropsychiatry, University of Wisconsin

The Rorschach method of personality evaluation requires on the part of the "subject" or person tested that he give his impressions of, or responses to, ten standard inkblots--black, white and coloured--which are printed on cards 9 by 7 inches. These ten inkblots are shown to him one by one with the question "What does this look like to you, or what might it be?" The individual's task therefore is simply to tell the examiner what these inkblots remind him of, or look like.

The role of the examiner is to take down verbatim what the subject says, question him as to certain characteristics of his answers; score, evaluate and tabulate these answers, and make his interpretation of the individual's psychological equipment on the basis of the information which he gets.

The very natural reaction of someone reading the above for the first time is likely to be sceptical and disparaging. It is just too simple to make sense: how can one learn anything of importance about a person's character and personality from his responses to a set of inkblots? Moreover, who is Rorschach, and why should one use his inkblots?

Before discussing the test therefore, it may be well to answer some of these initial questions. Hermann Rorschach, a Swiss psychiatrist, experimented for some ten years, comparing the

____________________
*
Formerly of the Montreal Neurological Institute.

-685-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Twentieth Century Psychology: Recent Developments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 714

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.