VI
EUROPE AND AFRICA: CAVE PAINTINGS, CARVINGS AND ROCK ENGRAVINGS

EARLY MAN'S MOST SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS ARE PAINTING AND SCULPTURE. FROM WHAT WE know of the prehistoric period in Europe, a sense of form is present even in his unpolished stone tools and bone implements. We have only the vestiges of whatever rude dwellings he may have had, and not even pottery can be traced back that far. It may be that song and dance antedate art, but art alone has survived. Prehistoric man's most spectacular accomplishments, the Ice Age pictures of large animals of the hunt, drawn or painted on the bare rock surfaces of caves, have been preserved, in some cases remarkably well. These paintings of the so-called Franco-Cantabrian style, in the caves of southwestern France and the Cantabrian mountains of northern Spain, are masterpieces of prehistoric art.


PREHISTORY

Prehistory is the period before the development of the art of writing. This means roughly about 3000 B.C. for Egypt and Sumer, somewhat later in China, and only a few centuries before the Christian era for most of the European continent.

The historic period of some five millennia is very short compared to the much longer Old Stone Age, or Paleolithic period. During the greater part of the Old Stone Age, Europe is believed to have

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Primitive Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 7
  • I - Africa 11
  • II - Alaska and the Pacific Northwest Coast 60
  • III - The United States: Forests, Plains and Deserts 105
  • IV - Mexico and the Andean Region 157
  • V - The South Seas and Australia 265
  • VI - Europe and Africa: Cave Paintings, Carvings and Rock Engravings 313
  • Acknowledgments 365
  • Selected Bibliography 367
  • Index 377
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