Human Organization Research: Field Relations and Techniques

By Richard N. Adams; Jack J. Preiss | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
THE COLLECTION AND ORGANIZATION OF FIELD MATERIALS: A RESEARCH REPORT*1

Kurt H. Wolff

THERE appear to be relatively few sociological and anthropological monographs that throw light on the process by which the student's experience in the field is transformed into his published statement.2 And yet, since it is, after all, a man -- and not some impersonal scientific apparatus -- who makes the study and since the student's subject matter, too, is man, however complexly abstracted he may be, it would seem exceed-

____________________
*
A slightly altered version of the paper by the same title that appeared in the Ohio Journal of Science, Vol. 52, No. 2 ( March, 1952), pp. 49-61. Reprinted with the permission of the editor of that journal.
1
Slight revision of Wolff (1952a), a paper read at the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the Ohio Valley Sociological Society, Bloomington, Ind. April 28,1951.
2
Most of those I know -- all of them anthropological -- are referred to in Herskovits ( 1948), chap. 6, "The Ethnographer's Laboratory," in which the first pages (81-83) of section 2 give an excellent example of the transformation of field experience into generalized statement. Among the references contained in that chapter, the most important ones are certain passages from M. J. and F. S. Herskovits ( 1934); Malinowski ( 1922) the relevant section of which is reprinted under the title "How an Anthropologist Works" in Haring ( 1949); Evans-Pritchard ( 1940); and Mead ( 1940). Cf. also Bateson ( 1932, esp. pp. 441-44, and 1936 [ 2nd ed., 1958], esp. chaps. i, viii, xvi). See also some pertinent passages in Wolff ( 1944, 1951), Mead ( 1949, chap. ii), and Bennett ( 1959). Radin ( 1957, pp. xxi-xii, "Methods of Approach") on the one hand, and Mead and Métraux ( 1953), on the other, contain statements and considerations that, when attention is specifically focused on this problem, might tease questions and answers relevant to it. The related problem of the bearing of the student's expectations, etc., on his eventual report leads, if pursued systematically, into the whole problem area of the sociology of knowledge. As a case in point cf. Redfield's and Lewis' studies of Tepoztán -- Redfield ( 1930; 1953, pp. 155-57; 1955, pp. 133-36); Lewis ( 1951, pp. 428-48). For another case see Bennett ( 1946). For an approach to the sociology of knowledge, which, in Bennett's words (32), includes "the observer in the frame of reference" -- that is, which applies some of the lessons of the "Loma" study to this field -- cf. Wolff ( 1953). And for an attempt at applying them to the whole problem of interpretation, exemplified by the interpretations of two texts ( Spitzer, 1949, and Simmel, 1950) and a cartoon ( Steinberg, 1947), cf. Wolff ( 1951).

-240-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Organization Research: Field Relations and Techniques
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 456

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.