A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

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JACINTO. The young Indian who serves as guide for Bishop Jean Latour in Death Comes for the Archbishop; during one excursion, a storm forces the two men to enter a sacred cave of Jacinto's people. According to an article entitled "Miguel Lamy, Indian Guide in Willa Cather Novel, Still Living at 85," which appeared in the Santa Fe New Mexican ( August 21, 1936), the character of Jacinto is drawn from Miguel Jacinto Lamy, an Indian guide. In the article Brother Claudius of St. Mary's College reports this finding as a result of his research among the Pueblo Indians. At that time, the octogenerian Miguel Jacinto Lamy was living in obscurity in Santa Fe, unaware of his celebrity. He knew of Death Comes for the Archbishop from other Indians, but had never seen it. He knew nothing of the story or of Willa Cather. However, conversation with him confirmed that the Jacinto in the novel is a true-to- life counterpart of the original. Jacinto Lamy acknowledged that Cather's story is very accurate and that the Archbishop, Jean Baptiste Lamy (q.v.), had found him seriously wounded after a battle between Pueblo and Navajo Indians and had nursed him back to health. Jacinto remained with Lamy, who baptized and christened him Miguel Jacinto Lamy. He was also a famous bear hunter. N: DC III, 1-3; IV, 1-2; V, 1; VII, 1, 3-4

JACK-A-BOY. The heart-winning little fellow who changes the lives of several lonely adults in "Jack-a-Boy." The prototype for Jack-a-Boy was Willa Cather's youngest brother, John Esten Cather, called Jack or Jack-a-Boy by the family. He was born at Red Cloud, Nebraska, on October 1, 1892, and attended Red Cloud schools. Later, he attended Carnegie Institute of Technology for more than three years, where he specialized in chemistry. Throughout World War I he worked in a Canadian munitions factory, having been exempted from the U.S. draft at the request of the Canadian government. After the war, Jack was employed in a wood alcohol plant in Smithport, Pennsylvania, where he continued until about 1933. He then went to California to enter the oil business with his brother Douglas(s) (q.v.). In June 1920 he married Irma Wells of Smithport. They had two daughters, Catherine C. Lowell and Ella C. Lewis. In California he lived at the Royal Palms

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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