A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

U

ULSTER PROTESTANT; ULSTERMAN. In My Mortal Enemy, the father of Oswald Henshawe is an Ulster Protestant. Myra Henshawe's uncle, John Driscoll, having reared the orphaned girl to be a devout Catholic, despised Oswald and cut Myra out of his will for marrying him. Thus, the difficult marriage of Myra and Oswald in My Mortal Enemy is a symbolic union of these opposing forces even three centuries after the strife began. The complex conflict between Protestants and Catholics in Northern Ireland began in the early 1600s during the rule of James I. He sought to suppress Catholicism by confiscating Catholic lands in Ireland and then repopulating them with English Protestants and Scotch Presbyterians. James's action met with much opposition, and most of the Protestants fled by 1607. However, Ulster, the northern province of Ireland, remained a stronghold where whole districts were given to the Protestant settlers, and it soon grew into a powerful and prosperous colony. Driven from good land to far poorer land, the displaced Catholics could only look helplessly on, hating the colonists. N: MM I, 2

"ULTIMO AMOR." In The Song of the Lark Spanish Johnny sings this song for Ray Kennedy after a picnic. This Spanish song has not been identified. N: SoL I, 7

ULYSSES. See HOMER--"Odyssey"

UMBERTO. Greatly agitated one night by the poor service of the hotel she was staying in, Thea Kronborg thinks of moving to the Umberto ( The Song of the Lark). No prototype has been identified. N: SoL VI, 11

UNCLE. The otherwise unnamed black preacher who helped Nancy escape through the underground railroad (q.v.) in Sapphira and the Slave Girl. N: SaS VII, 4

UNCLE (of Niel Herbert). See POMMEROY, JUDGE

UNCLE ALBERT; UNCLE DOCTOR. See ENGELHARDT, ALBERT (UNCLE)

UNCLE REMUS. Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings, a famous collection of sayings and stories by Joel Chandler Harris, based on authentic Negro folklore and first published in New York by Appleton in 1881. Hillary Templeton tells his family Uncle Remus stories to cheer them up. S: OM9

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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