Aksum: An African Civilisation of Late Antiquity

By Stuart Munro-Hay | Go to book overview

Chronological Chart.
Period 1. Early Aksum until the reign of GDRT. 1st- 2nd centuries AD.
100 AD Zoskales Periplus
Ptolemy
c. 150 AD
Period 2. GDRT-Endubis. Beginning of 3rd century AD to c. 270 AD.
200 AD
GDRT, BYGT South Arabian
inscriptions
230 AD 'DBH, GRMT
Sembrouthes
260 AD DTWNS and ZQRNS
Period 3. Endubis to Ezana before his conversion. c.270 AD to c.330 AD
270 AD
Endubis* Coinage begins
300 AD
Aphilas*
Wazeba*
Ousanas*
Ezana* Inscriptions.
Period 4. Ezana as a Christian to Kaleb. c. 330 AD to c. 520 AD.
330 AD
Christian inscriptions
and coins.
Anonymous Christian coins
350 AD
MHDYS*
Ouazebas*
400 AD
Eon*
Ebana*
Nezool*/Nezana*
500 AD Ousas*/Ousana(s)*. Tazena
Period 5. Kaleb until the end of the coinage. c.515 AD to early C.7th AD
Kaleb* Inscription
Yusuf As'ar
530 AD Sumyafa' Ashwa
Alla Amidas* Abreha
Wazena*
W'ZB/ Ella Gabaz
Ioel*
575 AD Persians in Yeman
Hataz* = 'Iathlia'*?
Israel*
600 AD Gersem*
614 AD Armah* Jerusalem falls
to Persia
619 AD Egypt falls to Persia
End of Aksum as
capital

-vii-

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Aksum: An African Civilisation of Late Antiquity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chronological Chart. vii
  • I- Introduction 1
  • II- Legend, Literature and Archaeological Discovery 9
  • III- The City and the State 30
  • IV- Aksumite History 61
  • V- The Capital City 104
  • VI- The Civil Administration 144
  • VII- The Monarchy 150
  • VIII- The Economy 166
  • IX- The Coinage 180
  • X- Religion 196
  • XI- Warfare 214
  • XII- Material Culture; the Archaeological Record 233
  • XIII- Language, Literature, and the Arts 244
  • XIV- Society and Death 252
  • XV- The Decline of Aksum 258
  • XVI- The British Institute in Eastern Africa's Excavations At Aksum 265
  • Bibliography 270
  • Index 285
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