Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation

By C. Peter Ripley; Roy E. Finkenbine et al. | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY
Adams, John Quincy ( 1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, also served in the U.S. Congress from 1831 to 1848, where he became an outspoken critic of slavery. Adams's work in defense of the mutineers on the slave ship Amistad helped advance the antislavery cause.
Allen, William G. ( 1820-?), a free black educator and author, taught at Central College in McGrawville, New York, from 1850 to 1852, after which he continued his antislavery activities and teaching career in the British Isles.
American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS) was founded in May 1840 by disaffected members of the American Anti-Slavery Society who repudiated the broad radical program of Garrison and his allies. Although several black leaders joined the new organization, most abandoned it by the mid-1850s.
American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) was founded in 1833 by a coalition of black and white abolitionists and soon became the center of radical antislavery sentiment in the North. It had auxiliaries in virtually every northern state; its publications, especially the National Anti-Slavery Standard, reflected the society's commitment to immediate emancipation and radical reform. The split in 1840 solidified Garrisonian control of the organization, but it divided again in 1865 over what role abolitionists should play in Reconstruction.
American Colonization Society (ACS) was founded to promote the settlement of free black Americans in Africa. From its beginning in 1816 until the early 1830s, the society, a mix of northern philanthropists, clergymen, prominent national politicians, and southern slaveholders, presented itself as a benevolent reform organization that would uplift blacks, Christianize Africa, and eventually end slavery. Northern black leaders opposed the movement, denouncing it as a threat to their liberty and a bulwark of slavery.
American Home Missionary Society (AHMS) was organized in 1826 by northern Presbyterian and Congregational leaders to assist poor churches. Its reluctance to condemn slavery alienated its abolitionist members who withdrew to establish the American Missionary Association.

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Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Editorial Statement xvii
  • Chronology xxi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Rise of Black Abolitionism 29
  • Chapter 2 - African Americans And the Antislavery Movement 69
  • Chapter 3 - Black Independence 121
  • Chapter 4 - Black Abolitionists and the National Crisis 170
  • Chapter 5 - Civil War 211
  • Glossary 263
  • Bibliographical Essay 279
  • Index 291
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