France Restored: Cold War Diplomacy and the Quest for Leadership in Europe, 1944-1954

By William I. Hitchcock | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have the great pleasure to acknowledge the generous assistance I received from various institutions that made possible the research and writing of this project. My exploratory research in Paris during the summer of 1989 was supported by the Council of European Studies of Columbia University and by a summer research grant from the MacArthur Foundation. The MacArthur Foundation also supported research in Paris during the 1990-91 academic year. During the summer of 1992, three grants allowed me to pursue research and writing: a John Enders Research Grant from the Yale Graduate School, a summer grant from the Yale Council on West European Studies, and a Truman Presidential Library Travel Grant. The European Community Studies Association and the Ford Foundation supported follow-up research in the summer of 1993, and the Smith Richardson Foundation helped me return to France for one last go at the archives in the summer of 1995. To all of these institutions, I am deeply grateful.

Doing research in French archives can often be a challenge, particularly for foreign scholars, and I wish to thank Madame Chantal Tourtier de Bonazzi of the Section Contemporaine of the National Archives, and the courteous and efficient staff of the Service des Archives of the French Foreign Ministry for doing so much to facilitate my research. I also received kind assistance from the staffs of the U.S. National Archives, the Truman Library, the Eisenhower Library, the Library of Congress, the Virginia Historical Society, and especially Yale's Sterling Memorial Library.

Lewis Bateman of the University of North Carolina Press encouraged me from the very outset of this project and tendered wise advice as the book took shape. Ron Maner and Judith Hoover patiently answered my many questions and oversaw the transformation of the raw manuscript into its more presentable final form.

At Yale, I have been fortunate to have a wonderful base of operations from which to work. In the past few years, International Security Studies has become a vibrant intellectual center for scholarship on international history and contemporary politics, and it has been a privilege to contribute to its development and expansion. It would have been a far less pleasurable place to work without the unfailingly competent and friendly staff: Ann Carter-Drier, Karen Ellis, Andrew Levine, and Susan Hennigan.

-xi-

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France Restored: Cold War Diplomacy and the Quest for Leadership in Europe, 1944-1954
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • TABLES & MAP viii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 The Founding Of The Fourth Republic And the Conditions For French Recovery 12
  • Chapter 2- The Limits Of Independence, 1944-1947 41
  • Chapter 3- No Longer A Great Power 72
  • Chapter 4- The Hard Road To Franco-German Rapprochement, 1948-1950 99
  • Chapter 5- Sound and Fury: the Debate Over German Rearmament 133
  • Chapter 6- The European Defense Community And French National Strategy 169
  • Conclusion 203
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliography 259
  • Index 281
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