Tribal Boundaries in the Nass Watershed

By Neil J. Sterritt; Susan Marsden et al. | Go to book overview

the upper Skeena) has been stated in the last decade or so by contemporary Nisga'a leaders, but it was not an issue in 1924 when the Gitksan delegation asserted their claim to territory in the Nass watershed before Prime Minister Mackenzie King, and in the presence of Nisga'a leaders in Prince Rupert, and, apart from the Calder document, it has not surfaced in the documentary record anywhere else after 1924.


Conclusion

The statements of prominent Nisga'a chiefs since the late nineteenth century are the best evidence of the extent of the Nisga'a claim on the Nass River. The Gitwandilix (Nisga'a of the upper Nass) record from the 1880s to the mid-1920s shows that they consider the "upper Nass" to be situated in the vicinity of Gitxsits'uuts'xwt, about twenty-five kilometres above Gitlakdamix. In other words, there is no evidence in this crucial period -- when witnesses and participants to the hostilities of the 1850s to 1860s were still alive -- of a Nisga'a chief claiming territory north of Gitxsits'uuts'xwt.

The Nisga'a claim that the petition of 1913 is proof of their ownership to the entire Nass watershed is not supported by their own record. On the contrary, the Nisga'a record shows that the metes and bounds description in the 1913 petition is imprecise. There is no question that the petition includes Meziadin Lake, but only because it includes Gitanyow territory.

Proof exists that the language of the petition is imprecise and only recently interpreted to mistakenly include the entire Nass watershed. In 1,908 the Nisga'a drafted a forerunner to the 1913 petition that claimed 224 kilometres of the Nass River, far short of its 384-kilometre length. In 1913 the uppermost of two maps that accompanied the latter petition covered Crown lands in the Meziadin area. In 1915 Nisga'a statements of ownership to the MMRC ended at Gitxsits'uuts'xwt. In 1916 a prominent Nisga'a chief, son-in-law of leading Gitlakdamix chief Sgat'iin, and his emissary drew a map showing the extent of Nisga'a territory as being slightly above Gitlakdamix, at a point that is clearly Gitxsits'uuts'xwt. In 1918 and 1930, two prominent persons connected with the petition and the Nisga'a claims effort defined Meziadin Lake as being at "the head of the Nass."

The Nisga'a chiefs who described their claim before the MMRC in 1915 made no claim to the Nass watershed above the Tchitin River at Gitxsits'uuts'xwt. On the basis of their evidence to the MMRC, there is no doubt that. On the Nisga'a knew their territory and were fighting against the government for its recognition. In 1915 Nisga'a territory went upriver as far as the mouth of the Tchitin River. Nothing has occurred since that date to justify its expansion.

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tribal Boundaries in the Nass Watershed
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1- Introduction 3
  • 2- The Adaawḵ Record and Tribal Boundaries in the Nass Watershed 15
  • Introduction 15
  • Conclusion 57
  • 3- The Gitksan Documentary Record: Gitanyow 59
  • 4- The Gitksan Documentary Record: Kuldo, Kisgaga'As, and Kispiox 98
  • Introduction 98
  • Conclusion 130
  • 5- The Nisga'A Documentary Record 132
  • Introduction 132
  • Conclusion 192
  • 6- Witnesses on the Land: The Euro-Canadian Record, 1832-1930 194
  • Introduction 194
  • Conclusion 240
  • 7- Conclusion 243
  • 8- Epilogue 251
  • Appendices 253
  • Notes 272
  • Glossary of Terms 293
  • Glossary of Place Names 295
  • Glossary of Chiefs' Names 312
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 319
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.