The Ethical Religion of Zoroaster

By Miles Menander Dawson | Go to book overview

PARALLELS WITH JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN SAYINGS

NOTHING is more extraordinary, perhaps, than the great number of parallels or near-parallels between texts to be found in the Zoroastrian scriptures and doctrines in the Old Testament and sometimes only in the New Testament, or the sacred traditions of the churches.

Surely the teachers of both these religions will wish the text of both Zoroaster and his disciples before them, arranged to show his splendid ethics and the trend of his religion.

Among these are the following:

ZOROASTRIANJEWISH AND CHRISTIAN
God, Ahura Mazda
King of Kings
A spirit
Not anthropomorphic
Made himself partly visible to
Zoroaster
A sevenfold Godhead, composed
of the Amesha Spentas
The incarnate word, the priest
God, the creator of all things
Period of creation, six days
A diurnal order of creation
The greatest creation, a righteous
man
Man and woman driven from
Paradise for sin
Ahriman, the devil
The father of lies
Heaven or Paradise
Hell and Purgatory
God, Jehovah Elohim
King of Kings
A spirit
Not anthropomorphic
His hinder parts seen by Moses

A triune Godhead, composed of
Father, Son and Holy Spirit
The Incarnate Word, Jesus
God, the creator of all things
The world created in six days
Separate creations, each day
Man the last and greatest crea-
tion
Man and woman banished from
Eden for disobedience
Satan, the devil
The father of lies
Heaven
Hell, Hades, Gehenna, and Pur-
gatory

-xxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ethical Religion of Zoroaster
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.