The Ethical Religion of Zoroaster

By Miles Menander Dawson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII TO DO GOOD AGAINST TO DO ILL

"EVER since the first being was created by us, I who am God ( Ahura Mazda) have not rested at my ease, because of providing protection for them whom I created; and in like manner he (Ahriman) also hath not rested, because of contriving evil for them whom I created."

Thus the Bundahis (c. XXVIII, 3) represents the Almighty to have spoken to the effect that wickedness is doing ill to his creatures, is wronging them or injuring them; and that at this task the ingenuity of the Evil Spirit and of all evil spirits was taxed continually while God is constant in his protecting care of all beneficial creatures.

Of all the religions of the world, the Zoroastrian is peculiar in that its origin, its raison d'âtre, is not obscure.

It came into existence on the steppes, the great, elevated prairies, of western Asia and southeastern Europe.

It was founded by a leader who was himself primarily a husbandman and herdsman.

Its fundamental posit was that God ( Ahura Mazda) is good, that he wishes the cultivation of land, that he desires the domestication and care of useful animals, that he favors the peaceful settlements of men; and, contrariwise, that evil is enmity unto God, that it

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