TEN
Conclusion

THE FOREGOING EXAMINATION AND ATTEMPTED REconstruction of the music performed in seven of Shakespeare's comedies is an inquiry, as close as the subject permits, into the nature of the music employed by Shakespeare, the purposes for which he used music, and the value of that music as a dramatic element. In order to make such a study, it has been necessary to consider Shakespeare's use of music not as an isolated phenomenon but as a part of the musical and dramatic milieu of his age. As an inevitable concomitant of this study, a consideration of certain problems of text, production, and stage history has been necessary.

The Elizabethan dramatist was technically well equipped. Beyond the bare dramatic necessities--actors, stage, and story--he was equipped with a magnificent language, with brilliant costumes, and with music whose popularity is attested by the extent to which it was used. That the works produced by the major playwrights of the period constitute the greatest chapter of English dramatic history yet written should be proof that the tools of their craft were used fully and expertly, and that these tools were used partly to overcome the handicaps--if they were such-- imposed by rudimentary stage scenery, clumsy machinery, and primitive lighting.

The use of music as a part of English drama can be traced from the origin of that drama in the medieval church to the present, though the two arts have diverged to a great degree since the Restoration. In the medieval church the music was supplied by the priests and the choirs; the later mystery cycles were accompanied by municipal and guild musicians; the interludes and moralities, by vagabond minstrels or the musicians of noble households. With the establishment of semipermanent companies

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare's Use of Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Plates viii
  • Introduction ix
  • One - The Songs in Elizabethan Drama 1
  • Two - Instrumental Music in Elizabethan Drama 16
  • Three - The Two Gentlemen of Verona 51
  • Four - Love's Labour's Lost 65
  • Five - A Midsummer Night's Dream 82
  • Six - The Merchant of Venice 105
  • Seven - Much Ado About Nothing 120
  • Eight - As You like It 139
  • Nine - Twelfth Night 164
  • Ten - Conclusion 187
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.