International Security: The American Role in Collective Action for Peace

By Philip C. Jessup | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
WHAT WILL THE UNITED STATES DO?

Assuming that the United States is not prepared to accept in the form of binding treaty obligations, commitments on future action comparable to those which the members of the League have assumed and are apparently willing to assume, the question remains whether, in time of crisis, the United States will act in a way which will further or retard international efforts for the preservation of peace.1 The crucial test is provided by a situation in which the members of the League are desirous of taking action under the sanction articles of the Covenant. Anticipation that the United States may take a stand which would nullify or seriously interfere with the action of the League is frequently alleged to be one of the chief obstacles to the effective operation of the Covenant. In analyzing this situation, it seems desirable to devote attention first to the problem of neutrality.


Neutrality

The policy of neutrality is firmly imbedded in American thought and practice. The American people are inclined to regard it as a traditional American doctrine in the same category as the Monroe Doctrine. They think of it chiefly as synonymous with keeping out of war and are not much aware of the wide difference between the legal impartiality which neutrality exacts and the factual partiality which it permits. There is little realization that this policy of neutrality, which was adopted by the administration of President Washington primarily as a means of avoiding embroilment in the French Revolu-

____________________
1
A consideration of various situations inevitably leads to suggestions for some further agreements and thus makes impossible a clear line between this chapter and the one next preceding.

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Security: The American Role in Collective Action for Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 162

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.