II. Selections from Thoreau's Writings

WHERE I LIVED AND WHAT I LIVED FOR

from Walden

AT A CERTAIN SEASON of our life we are accustomed to consider every spot as the possible site of a house. I have thus surveyed the country on every side within a dozen miles of where I live. In imagination I have bought all the farms in succession, for all were to be bought, and I knew their price. I walked over each farmer's premises, tasted his wild apples, discoursed on husbandry with him, took his farm at his price, at any price, mortgaging it to him in my mind; even put a higher price on it,--took everything but a deed of it,--took his word for his deed, for I dearly love to talk,--cultivated it,--and him too to some extent, I trust, and withdrew when I had enjoyed it long enough, leaving him to carry it on. This experience entitled me to be regarded as a sort of real-estate broker by my friends. Wherever I sat, there I might live, and the landscape radiated from me accordingly. What is a house but a sedes, a seat?--better if a country seat. I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it. Well, there I might live, I said; and there I did live,

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Thoreau, Man of Concord
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Word to the Student vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Documents xv
  • Thoreau Documents 1
  • I - A Thoreau Chronology 195
  • II - Selections from Thoreau's Writings 197
  • III - Biographical Notes On the Authors 235
  • IV - Bibliography 245
  • V - Suggested Topics for Papers 247
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